A War on Children: The Consequences of Poverty on Child Development

Psychology Benefits Society

Young biracial girl staring into camera

This post continues our new blog series on poverty. As our nation reflects on its progress in fighting poverty over the last 50 years, this blog series will highlight how psychology can contribute further to this discussion.

By Roseanne L. Flores, PhD – (Member, APA Coalition for Psychology in Schools and Education)

In 2012, over 16 million children – 22% of all children – lived in families with incomes that fall below the federal poverty level. According to the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Children’s Defense Fund, Black, Hispanic, and American Indian children comprise the majority of children who are poor. Additionally, children of immigrant parents are at risk for being poor.

Poor children are at greater risk for physical and mental health problems than their wealthier peers, and growing up in poverty is associated with poor educational outcomes. So one might ask “if being raised in…

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A War on Children: The Consequences of Poverty on Child Development